About this Show

[untitled]

NETWORK

DURATION
00:31:00

RATING

SCANNED IN
San Francisco, CA, USA

SOURCE
Comcast Cable

TUNER
Channel 24

VIDEO CODEC
mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
544

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

San Francisco 5, Us 2, California 2, Weber 1, U.n. 1, Fbi 1, Spiller 1, Google 1, Netflix 1, Tomatoy 1, Smoky 1, Etc. 1, Spoked Paprika 1,
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  SFGTV2    [untitled]  

    August 28, 2013
    10:00 - 10:31am PDT  

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facebook. would you think is sitting at 50 to one? for your technical people in the room, do you think they are operating inefficiently? no, i do not think so. furthermore, do you think that they are using all those servers to serve up web pages? no. right? these are truly information- power businesses. at the end of the day, my opinion -- lots of people may share this -- is all companies and that being information companies. all companies and of being software companies. i just did he know speech for a large german car company that you may know, that is clearly when you start realizing what they are trying to do, right -- it is really can we use all this cloud technology to takeoff structures down and across this down so now, i can change and 8% spent on a bunch of stuff that other people can go due to 80% i get to build applications, which
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power a very different experience. you think about what the car of the future might look like, it is a computer with four wheels, right? that is what it is. what they start to do with it, etc., is completely different. i'm talking about what we all conceptualize as a manufacturer. when you ask the question what will happen in the future? it is harnessing this technology to really deliver a service economy, and the companies that do this, the guys that figure this out are going to be big winners, and they are going to change the way we think of them, the way we relate to them, the way we buy from them, all of that. that is what the future holds. i see the floor. >> thank you. i think the best questions are yet to come, and we are going to turn it over to the audience. >> we would like to remind our listening and viewing audience that this is a program with the commonwealth club of california on the future of cloud
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computing. our thanks to our distinguished panel for their comments here today. now, we open the floor for a q&a session. we will be passing around a microphone, so if you have questions, please raise your hand and speak into the microphone. >> i have a key question about the backup plan. you mentioned the super bowl earlier. what is the backup plan in the unlikely catastrophic event of the disabling of the system? solar storm or whatever. >> there are lots of things that can go wrong. the rights can hit the planet, and the things go dark, and then we fix it. in general, the technology you are talking about is something which is broadly called cloud bursting, where essentially, is used by google and other folks, there's not one computer called
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google.com. there's a basilian sitting behind a thing. there is a concept called load balancing, and it has been augmented of late with the ability to dynamically spinoff new instances of server applications in response to spikes in demand. the general concept called cloud bursting allows you to do that across multiple cloud vendors, so you could do it across amazon and various other people say you could get geographic diversity and so on. people doing this extremely well, for example, would be netflix. many of you in this room i'm sure use the netflix. what they did is dynamically throw what is this is as more and more people click on movies that they want to watch. so then what they are doing is as the need scales, they then have the ability -- they pay them, and, of course, it drops off as soon as the need drops off as well. so they end up essentially paying for average demand. the technology is widely deployed around the world.
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>> as kind of a follow-up, individuals often use cloud services for backing up their computers. are we about to see people using their computers to back up their clout services to guarantee that they hold on to their data? >> you are at the tip of a very interesting iceberg. go 100,000 miles in space and look down at the earth. we are still driving more wavelength down. there is no problem distributing content out to users. what we have a fundamental problem with is distribution of power. power is dominating in terms of distribution networks q one of the reasons why it does not make sense is because you are at the end of the tree, a long way from distribution, a lot of transmission loss. the data centers move to where power gets generated. what is the next hardest thing to move? big data.
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did it is still really hard to move, even though we have lots of wavelets. that says that the application moves to the data is. if you think about facebook and google and all those folks, they build data center's right were the power is generated. typically near hydro plants and so on. what you find is that more and more applications will move to where the data is. moving those big chunks of data is very difficult. in terms of enterprises in the cloud, there is certainly no reason to suspect that the systems used by cloud vendors like amazon are not capable of geographic replication and redundancy. it is absolutely the case that someone like netflix, for example, could survive an outage of two simultaneous amazon did a centers through geographic redundancy and so on. this stuff exists, and the technology exists within the cloud providers to make sure that once your data gets there,
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it is not going away. it is just not a cloud provider solution. most enterprises will have things called disaster recovery, where they will keep all their critical data completely synchronized so that if one coast gets hit by an earthquake or terrorist attack, you have the other coast where you can get your data. it is completely synchronized, always available, on demand. geographically diverse disaster recovery solutions have been in place for some time, and they actually do allow for secure data storage. >> i think that for the individual consumer and home user, this storage in the cloud and backing up your personal computer in the cloud has been burgeoning of late because people want to have the ability to store their files securely, but the reason why, to answer your question, is why do they
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continue to still backed up their clout back of solution onto a usb stick or on to their own pc is people still have to get comfortable with the idea of clout security, that the data truly is secure and they're comfortable with letting go. people still not quite comfortable with that concept yet. as people become more and more confident and more and more comfortable with the concept of data being safe, we will still have people, and we will still have instances where people want their data next to them, where they feel comfortable, where they feel safe and confident that their data is secure. >> if i were purchasing services from a cloud vendor, i would mandate that all data at risk is encrypted using keys that i own, that i provide when it is processed for me, and there is no excuse for anybody not doing this. the technology exists. so it comes down to the probability that a bad guy could
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go and guess relocation. in amazon web services, you have more than 3.5 billion objects. they have to know which one to go for it here that have to break your access. then they have to break the description on the of jets. the probability of stealing your data and getting away with an attack is vanishingly small. >> i think you address one of my concerns, which was the security of my data out on the cloud, but you raised a new question -- who owns my data? what if i do want it to go away? >> there are very challenging concerns. certainly, governed by state boundaries. for example, numerous canadians do not want their data in american dissenters. under a land the vessels, that can be subject to inspection and seizure. all the regulations relate to national boundaries there as
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well. a cloud providers actually end up having to meet numerous diverse regulatory requirements related to where data may resign and how it may be encrypted. there are different purchase centers for different christian center's and countries -- there are different encryption centers for different regions and countries. i think amazon wishes they could make it go away the same way they imagine the sales tax would go away sunday. [laughter] >> but is it clear that i own my data? >> it is clear that you own your data, but it is not clear that somebody with the opprobrious search and seizure warrants cannot just make off with it, too. and, of course, you know, here is the scary one. the fbi says there is an attack coming out of those few racks over there, and they walked out with several companies entire computer set up just because
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some guy in one of those was doing a bad thing. that is scary. >> unfortunately, we have time for only one last question. weber has the microphone, please. then maybe it is a mistake, but i have the microphone. i came to this lecture trying to find a definition of what cloud computing is. maybe i understand a little better, but i still do not have its in the simple terminology that i understand. my other question is from my point of view as a user of computing services, i have recently had the experience with a couple of banks going through a total change of their website, which caused me no end of aggravation to try to continue my accessing of my data, and i had the feeling, and i think you
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kind of touched on this, that for maybe financial reasons or because you technology people are so influential in the world you convinced these banks they had to do this, it just really made my life miserable for a couple of weeks trying to figure out how to use their new system. i mean, it seems to me that -- you know, i had the impression that technology people are sort of making work for themselves by influencing institutions that they need to change what they have already in place. i still go by the old model -- if it is not broken, do not fix it. so i am opposing these questions to the senate panel. >> those are great observations. i am in my mid-40's by now, and there are programming languages used regularly that just did not
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exist five years ago. when you hear these guys talk, it is like gobbledygook to me. you get old with your music. you get old with your skills sets. it is just the way it is. because we are a technology- driven society, and we have completely inverted the traditional way back societies were built when -- where when you were older, what you learned was survival skill, and you were right. that is the problem. the young guys are right, and the old guys take it in the net. cloud computing -- let me try a simple one for you. used to be in the old days that everybody had their own electricity generating plant. people would generate electricity locally for their own production means for their own factory. that got turned into a utility. the economics and study of that
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is very interesting. there's a fabulous book called "the big switch" which basically tracks that history. think of what clout is doing to computing is being analogous. instead of having to own and run your own software and hardware and computer systems, these things simply become services that you acquired by some horribly complicated plug. so it becomes viable economically -- the economics are compelling. you can consume by plugging in. you have to plug, yes, it is still the case that you know too much, but it is really that, that turning computation into a utility that can be consumed as opposed to requiring human to surround previous manifestations of the technology.
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>> i thank the panel for coming here today. we also thank our audience here for those listening and viewing. now, this meeting of the commonwealth club of california commemorating its 108th year of discussion is adjourned. [applause]
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>> hello. you're watching the show that explores san francisco's love affair with food. there are at least 18 farmers markets in san francisco alone, providing fresh and affordable to year-round. this is a great resource that does not break the bank.
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to show just how easy it can be to do just that, we have come up with something called the farmers' market challenge. we find someone who loves to cook, give them $20, and challenge them to create a delicious meal from ingredients found right here in the farmer's market. who did we find for today's challenge? >> today with regard to made a pot greater thanchapino. >> you only have $20 to spend. >> i know peter it is going to be tough, but i think i can do it. it is a san francisco classic. we are celebrating bay area food. we have nice beautiful plum tomatoes here. we have some beautiful fresh fish here. it will come together beautifully.
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>> many to cut out all this talk, and let's go shop. yeah. ♪ >> what makes your dish unique? >> i like it spicy and smoky. i will take fresh italian tomatoes and the fresh seafood, and will bring them to other with some nice spoked paprika and some nice smoked jalapeno peppers. i am going to stew them up and get a nice savory, smoky, fishy, tomatoy, spicy broth. >> bring it on. how are you feeling? >> i feel good. i spent the $20 and have a few pennies less. i am going to go home and cook. i will text message u.n. is done.
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>> excellent and really looking forward to it. >> today we're going to make the san francisco classic dish invented by italian and portuguese fishermen. it'll be like a nice spaghetti sauce. then we will put in the fish soup. the last thing is the dungeon as crab, let it all blend together. it will be delicious. when i could, i will try to make healthy meals with fresh ingredients, whatever is in season and local. those juicy, fresh tomatoes will take about an hour to cook down into a nice sauce. this is a good time to make our fish stock. we will take a step that seems like trash and boil it up in water and make a delicious and they speed up my parents were great clerics, and we had wonderful food. family dinners are very important. any chance you can sit down together and have a meal together, it is great communal atmosphere. one of the things i like the most is the opportunity to be creative. hello.
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anybody with sets their mind to it can cut. always nice to start chopping some vegetables and x and the delicious. all this double in view is this broth with great flavor. but your heart into it. make something that you, family, and friends will really enjoy. >> i am here with a manager at the heart of the city farmer's market in san francisco. thank you for joining us. tell us a little bit about the organization. >> we're 30 years old now. we started with 14 farmers, and it has grown out to over 80. >> what is the mission of the organization? >> this area has no grocery store spiller it is all mom-and- pop stores. we have this because it is needed. we knew it was needed. and the plaza needed somebody. it was empty. beautiful with city hall in the background. >> thank

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